Computer Basic For Beginners.

How to Use the Lessons

Every topic is presented on two facing pages, so that you can concentrate on the lesson without having to worry about turning the page. Since this is a hands-on course, each lesson contains an exercise with step-by-step instructions for you to follow.

To make learning easier, every exercise follows certain conventions:

  • Anything you’re supposed to click, drag, or press appears like this.
  • Anything you’re supposed to type appears like this.
  • This book never assumes you know where (or what) something is. The first time you’re told to click something, a picture of what you’re supposed to click appears either in the margin next to the step or in the illustrations at the beginning of the lesson.

Illustrations show what your screen should look like as you follow the lesson. They also describe controls, dialog boxes, and processes.

24 Microsoft Excel 2000

Lesson 4-2: Formatting Values

An easy-to-understand introduction explains the task or topic covered in the lesson and what you‘ll be doing in the exercise.

Figure 4-3

The Numbers tab of the Format Cells dialog box.

Figure 4-4

The Expense Report worksheet values before being formatted.

Figure 4-5

The Expense Report worksheet values after being formatted.

Select a number category

Figure 4-3

Preview of the selected number format

Select a number format

Figure 4-4 Figure 4-5

Tips and traps appear in the margin.

Icons and pictures appear in the margin, showing you what to click or look for.

Clear step-by-step instructions guide you through the exercise. Anything you need to click appears like this.

You can also format values by using the Formatting toolbar or by selecting Format  Cells from the menu and clicking the Number tab.

Comma Style button

In this lesson, you will learn how to apply number formats. Applying number formatting changes how values are displayed—it doesn’t change the actual information in any way. Excel is often smart enough to apply some number formatting automatically. For example, if you use a dollar sign to indicate currency (such as $548.67), Excel will automatically apply the currency number format for you.

The Formatting toolbar has five buttons (Currency, Percent, Comma, Increase Decimal, and Decrease Decimal) you can use to quickly apply common number formats. If none of these buttons has what you’re looking for, you need to use the Format Cells dialog box by selecting Format  Cells from the menu and clicking the Number tab. Formatting numbers with the Format Cells dialog box isn’t as fast as using the toolbar, but it gives you more precision and formatting options. We’ll use both methods in this lesson.

Select the cell range D5:D17 and click the Comma Style button on the Formatting toolbar.

Excel adds a hundreds separator (the comma) and two decimal places to the selected cell range.

When you see a keyboard instruction like ―press + ,‖ you should press and hold the first key ( in this example) while you press the second key ( in this

example). Then, after you’ve pressed both keys, you can release them.

There is usually more than one way to do something in Word. The exercise explains the most common method of doing something, while the alternate methods appear in the margin. Use whatever approach feels most comfortable for you.

Important terms appear in italics the first time they’re presented.

Whenever something is especially difficult or can easily go wrong, you’ll see a:

NOTE:

immediately after the step, warning you of pitfalls that you could encounter if you’re not careful.

Our exclusive Quick Reference box appears at the end of every lesson. You can use it to review the skills you’ve learned in the lesson and as a handy reference—when you need to know how to do something fast and don’t need to step through the sample exercises.

Formatting a Worksheet 25

Click cell A4 and type Annual Sales.

The numbers in this column should be formatted as currency.

Press to confirm your entry and overwrite the existing information.

Select the cell range G5:G17 and click the Currency Style button on the Formatting toolbar.

A dollar sign and two decimal places are added to the values in the selected cell range.

Select the cell range F5:F17 and click the Percent Style button on the Formatting toolbar.

Excel applies percentage style number formatting to the information in the Tax column. Notice there isn’t a decimal place—Excel rounds any decimal places to the nearest whole number. That isn’t suitable here—you want to include a decimal place to accurately show the exact tax rate.

With the Tax cell range still selected, click the Increase Decimal button on the Formatting toolbar.

Excel adds one decimal place to the information in the tax rate column.

Next, you want to change the date format in the date column. There isn’t a ―Format Date‖ button on the Formatting toolbar, so you will have to format the date column using the Format Cells dialog box.

The Formatting toolbar is great for quickly applying the most common formatting options to cells, but it doesn’t offer every available formatting option. To see and/or use every possible character formatting option you have to use the Format Cells dialog box. You can open the Format Cells dialog box by either selecting Format Cells from the menu or right-clicking and selecting Format Cells from the shortcut menu.

With the Date cell range still selected, select Format  Cells from the menu, select 4-Mar-97 from the Type list box and click OK.

That’s all there is to formatting values–not as difficult as you thought it would be, was it? The following table lists the five buttons on the Formatting toolbar you can use to apply number formatting to the values in your worksheets.

Table 4-2: Number Formatting Buttons on the Formatting Toolbar

Button Name Example Formatting

Currency Style button

Other Ways to Apply Currency Formatting:

Type the dollar sign ($) before you enter a number.

 Quick Reference

To Apply Number Formatting:

Select the cell or cell range you want to format and click the appropriate number formatting button(s) on the Formatting toolbar.

Or…

Currency

$1,000.00

Adds a dollar sign, comma, and two decimal places.

Percent

100%

Displays the value as a percentage with no decimal places.

Comma

1,000

Separates thousands with a comma.

Increase Decimal

1000.00

Increases the number of digits after the decimal point by one

Decrease Decimal

1000.0

Decreases the number of digits after the decimal point by one

Select the cell or cell range you want to format, select Format

Cells from the menu, click

the Number tab, and specify the number formatting you want to apply.

Or…

Select the cell or cell range you want to format, right-click the cell or cell range and select Format Cells from the shortcut menu, click the Number tab, and specify the number formatting you want to apply.

Anything you need to type appears like this.

Whenever there is more than one way to do something, the most common method is presented in the exercise and the alternate methods are presented in the margin.

Tables provide summaries of the terms, toolbar buttons, or shortcuts covered in the lesson.

CustomGuide‘s exclusive Quick Reference is great for when you need to know how to do something fast. It also lets you review what you‘ve learned in the lesson.

 

Related posts

Leave a Reply